Sexism in Baha'i cult


Baha'i Faith, almost certainly be touted as promoting "equality of men and women" and as such would be a progressive belief almost unique in the world's religions if it was totally true. The Baha’i Faith claims to support the ideal of equality of men and women as a basic teaching.

But full equality of the sexes? Not in the Baha’i Faith as women are deprived the right to be elected as members of the Universal House of Justice.

Though Baha'u'llah, the prophet-founder of the Baha'i Faith, plainly said that in his religion "women are as men." What the public generally doesn't know, is that women are excluded from serving on the religion's highest governing body, the Universal House of Justice. The Universal House of Justice is the international governing council of the Bahá’í Faith and the center of Bahá’u’lláh’s Covenant today. The ineligibility of women for membership on the Universal House of Justice the exclusion of women from the House is impossible to change, since that provision occurs in the "authorized interpretations" of Baha'i scripture.

The Bahá’í Faith counsel proclaims in understanding of this established provision of the Order of Bahá’u’lláh that membership of the Universal House of Justice is confined to men only, the important point for Bahá’ís to remember is that in the face of the categorical pronouncements in Bahá’í Scripture establishing the equality of men and women, the ineligibility of women for membership on the Universal House of Justice does not constitute evidence of the superiority of men over women.
But no matter how they say it is otherwise membership of the Universal House of Justice is confined to men only is sexist and does constitute evidence of the Bahá’í Faith support of superiority of men over women.

Not only are women excluded from membership in the Universal House of Justice as not a small thing, but is a big deal that is very important as Universal House of Justice body has absolute power over the rest of the worldwide Baha’i community, by its being considered infallible, like Baha’u’llah, Abdu’l-Baha, and Shoghi Effendi before them. All of them were also men, by the way. Clearly, the idea that the sexes are equal in the Baha’i Faith is an outright lie. When a body that has absolute power excludes women from its membership, that means the women of that community have NO power of their own and any appearances of authority from any Baha’i woman is merely phony window dressing.

The exclusion from service of women on the religion's highest elected institution is not a sign of equality at all. To support women being excluded from the Universal House of Justice Shoghi Effendi quoted from a letter written by his grandfather 'Abdu'l-Baha, which said that Baha'u'llah referred to the members of the House of Justice as "men", and that women were therefore not eligible to serve. To many Baha'is, this exclusion cannot be changed any more than a Christian could remove an inconvenient passage from the Bible.

In 1988, a paper called "The Service of Women on the Institutions of the Baha'i Faith" was written by a group of young Baha'i scholars and presented to an Association for Baha'i Studies conference in New Zealand that same year. However, Baha'i authorities suppressed the article, and its authors were forbidden to circulate it, and few were aware of it until it was published on the web in the mid-90s. What this paper revealed was that the letter Shoghi Effendi quoted, and used as a justification for excluding women from the Universal House of Justice was actually written to an early American believer in 1909 and referred to the "House of Justice" (now Spiritual Assembly)in Chicago. The intention of this exclusion, made at a time when most American women didn't have the right to vote even in ordinary governmental elections, was probably to avoid undue controversy.

It is a principle of the Baha'i Faith to apply its laws and teachings gradually and "wisely". There are still laws which exist in Baha'i scripture that are not yet applicable world-wide. However, 'Abdu'l-Baha later reversed the policy of exclusion, giving women the equal status on local and national assemblies that they now enjoy. Besides bringing up the historical context for the letter used to justify women's exclusion, the "Service of Women" paper points out that while Baha'u'llah refers to the members of the "House of Justice" as men, he also does so when referring to the plural. A reference to "houses of justice" could only mean the local bodies, so that if he intended to exclude women from serving, this would have meant at all levels. It should also be pointed out that the term used for "men" in Arabic, can also be used to mean "notables".

Instead of welcoming the possibility of resolving a clear conflict between principle and practice in the Baha'i Faith, the Universal House of Justice reacted by suppressing and denying this information. In fact, openly opposing the official stance on this issue can result in retaliation by Baha'i institutions. In 1997,Canadian fantasy writer Michael McKenny was summarily disenrolled, primarily for his outspokenness on email forums for women's full inclusion in Baha'i administration. In fact, this was the first time the penalty of disenrollment had ever been used, and it was apparently specifically devised to deal with dissidents on the Internet.


Furthermore, in the Baha'i Faith there are particular cases of assignment of different roles to women and men at the level of individual life, family, and society.

Men are, for example, required to do a pilgrimage if they are financially capable of it, and women are not required. Nor are women required as men to be involved in fasting and saying obligatory prayers or an alternative prayer, during menstruation. Mothers have a right for financial support from their husbands, but not the opposite, while they still retain their other rights. A dowry is required to be given from man to woman for a marriage. In cases where there is no ‘last will and testament’ of a deceased person (which is not supposed to happen very often, since Baha’is are required by Bahaullah to write a will to determine how to dispose their property as they wish), some of their female relatives receive an inheritance slightly less than the male relatives.

Source : http://atheistnexus.org/profiles/blogs/sexism-in-bahaism

What made me leave the Baha'i faith ?

By diamondsouled


...I do agree though that the Baha'i Faith, in all it's various incarnations, is a cult.

I was indoctrinated into the Baha'i Faith from the age of seven. I grew up believing that I was one of the chosen. Over the years though more and more Baha'i contradictions began to pile up to the point where I could no longer ignore them.

One of the first was when I asked my mother at around the age of 15 why women were not allowed to be members of the Universal House of Justice. Her response made me think. She said that women were not allowed to be members of the Universal House of Justice because of their monthly periods where they might be too emotional to made good decisions. I laugh now when I think back on that answer.

Such contradictions continued to mount for many years. At one event sponsored by the Regional Teaching Committee on the lower mainland in BC I attended a meeting where they advised the particapants to befriend people of Chinese ancestor for the purpose of converting them to the Baha'i Faith. We were cautioned to not reveal at first that Baha'u'llah was a prophet and Baha'i a religion but to say that Baha'u'llah was a social reformer and Baha'i a social movement. I immediately developed a sinking feeling in the pit of my stomach. I felt like I'd walked into a Scientology meeting by mistake. I left that meeting without saying goodbye and the Faith was never the same for me after that Baha'i cult experience.

I did attend meetings in other Baha'i communities after that eye opener but the evidence that Baha'i is a cult simply mounted.

I attended one meeting in Creston BC where members of the Doukabor community were invited. The Doukabor folks shared some lovely singing after which the traveling Baha'i teacher gave a short lecture about the Baha'i Faith. At the end of her lecture this Baha'i teacher broke out the conversion cards she had with her and invited the lovely Doukabor folks to sign time. I had to speak out. Proselytization isn't allowed in the Baha'i Faith and this was a clear case of proselytization.

The host was taken off guard when I mentioned the Baha'i prohibition on proselytization, especially after the fine Doulabor folks agreed that a clear attempt to convert them had been made. They had shared lovely singing the Baha'is has shared nothing but a shallow attempt to convert.

The traveling Baha'i teacher shot daggers at me when I apologized for raining on her parade.

Eventually such clear evidence of the Baha'i Faith's cult status mounted until I could no longer in good conscience remain a Baha'i. I resigned from the Baha'i Faith after 45 years of being Baha'i.

Cheers

Larry Rowe

https://www.reddit.com/r/exbahai/comments/60619t/what_make_you_leave_the_faith/

Shoghi Effendi writes about chastisement of Muslims and Christians!



by : A35821361

On March 11, 1936, Shoghi Effendi wrote a letter later published as The Unfolding of World Civilization, a document included in the book titled World Order of Bahá'u'lláh

Within the The Unfolding of World Civilization are sections, such as one entitled Collapse of Islam, in which Shoghi Effendi summarizes late Ottoman and early Turkish Republican history in these terms...
The murder of that arrogant despot in the year 1876; the Russo-Turkish conflict that soon followed in its wake; the wars of liberation which succeeded it; the rise of the Young Turk movement; the Turkish Revolution of 1909 that precipitated the downfall of ‘Abdu’l-Ḥamíd; the Balkan wars with their calamitous consequences; the liberation of Palestine enshrining within its bosom the cities of ‘Akká and Haifa, the world center of an emancipated Faith; the further dismemberment decreed by the Treaty of Versailles; the abolition of the Sultanate and the downfall of the House of Uthmán; the extinction of the Caliphate; the disestablishment of the State Religion; the annulment of the Sharí’ah Law and the promulgation of a universal Civil Code; the suppression of various orders, beliefs, traditions and ceremonials believed to be inextricably interwoven with the fabric of the Muslim Faith—these followed with an ease and swiftness that no man had dared envisage. In these devastating blows, administered by friend and foe alike, by Christian nations and professing Muslims, every follower of the persecuted Faith of Bahá’u’lláh recognized evidences of the directing Hand of the departed Founder of his religion, Who, from the invisible Realm, was unloosing a flood of well-deserved calamities upon a rebellious religion and nation. World Order of Bahá’u’lláh, page 175
Three thoughts from this passage:

1) Shoghi Effendi considers the British seizure of Palestine a "liberation." By the time World Order of Bahá’u’lláh was published in 1938, the British had permitted the immigration of hundreds of thousands of Jewish settlers to Palestine, and in 1937 the Peel Commission proposed a partition of Palestine into Jewish and Arab sectors. The proposal was rejected by both the Arab and Jewish leadership. It is not mere conspiratorial inklings that lead detractors to consider the Bahá'í Faith to have ties to Zionism or British and Russian Imperialism.

2) Shoghi Effendi refers to "the further dismemberment decreed by the Treaty of Versailles" of the Ottoman Empire. The Treaty of Versailles was signed between Germany and some of the Allied nations, and it did not pertain to the Ottoman Empire. The Ottoman Empire would cease hostilities with Allies through the Armistice of Mudros, and Treaty of Sevres that was signed at the end of World War I was never ratified by the Ottoman Parliament in Istanbul. The nascent Republic of Turkey would later sign the Treaty of Lausanne with the Allies.

3) Shoghi Effendi describes the suffering of Ottoman subjects in World War I to have been "well-deserved calamities" unloosed by the "directing Hand" of Bahá'u'lláh. One wonders how anyone can equate Bahá'u'lláh's exile, where he was still allowed to lead his religious community and publicly declare himself Him whom God shall make manifest, with the suffering of World War I

In the following section, Deterioration of Christian Institutions, Shoghi Effendi similarly targets Christianity...
Time alone can reveal the nature of the rôle which the institutions directly associated with the Christian Faith are destined to assume in this, the Formative Period of the Bahá’í Era, this dark age of transition through which humanity as a whole is passing. Such events as have already transpired, however, are of such a nature as can indicate the direction in which these institutions are moving. We can, in some degree, appraise the probable effect which the forces operating both within the Bahá’í Faith and outside it will exert upon them.
In the section titled Community of the Most Great Name, Shoghi Effendi lauds the Bahá’ís...
Conscious of their high calling, confident in the society-building power which their Faith possesses, they press forward, undeterred and undismayed, in their efforts to fashion and perfect the necessary instruments wherein the embryonic World Order of Bahá’u’lláh can mature and develop. It is this building process, slow and unobtrusive, to which the life of the world-wide Bahá’í Community is wholly consecrated, that constitutes the one hope of a stricken society. For this process is actuated by the generating influence of God’s changeless Purpose, and is evolving within the framework of the Administrative Order of His Faith.
In a world the structure of whose political and social institutions is impaired, whose vision is befogged, whose conscience is bewildered, whose religious systems have become anemic and lost their virtue, this healing Agency, this leavening Power, this cementing Force, intensely alive and all-pervasive, has been taking shape, is crystallizing into institutions, is mobilizing its forces, and is preparing for the spiritual conquest and the complete redemption of mankind. Though the society which incarnates its ideals be small, and its direct and tangible benefits as yet inconsiderable, yet the potentialities with which it has been endowed, and through which it is destined to regenerate the individual and rebuild a broken world, are incalculable.
Shoghi Effendi continues in Divine Retribution...
Ominous indeed is the voice of Bahá’u’lláh that rings through these prophetic words: “O ye peoples of the world! Know, verily, that an unforeseen calamity followeth you, and grievous retribution awaiteth you. Think not that which ye have committed hath been effaced in My sight.” And again: “We have a fixed time for you, O peoples. If ye fail, at the appointed hour, to turn towards God, He, verily, will lay violent hold on you, and will cause grievous afflictions to assail you from every direction. How severe, indeed, is the chastisement with which your Lord will then chastise you!”
He concludes with World Unity the Goal...
A world federal system, ruling the whole earth and exercising unchallengeable authority over its unimaginably vast resources, blending and embodying the ideals of both the East and the West, liberated from the curse of war and its miseries, and bent on the exploitation of all the available sources of energy on the surface of the planet, a system in which Force is made the servant of Justice, whose life is sustained by its universal recognition of one God and by its allegiance to one common Revelation—such is the goal towards which humanity, impelled by the unifying forces of life, is moving.
...
What more fitting conclusion to this theme than these words of Bahá’u’lláh, written in anticipation of the golden age of His Faith—the age in which the face of the earth, from pole to pole, will mirror the ineffable splendors of the Abhá Paradise? “This is the Day whereon naught can be seen except the splendors of the Light that shineth from the face of thy Lord, the Gracious, the Most Bountiful. Verily, We have caused every soul to expire by virtue of Our irresistible and all-subduing sovereignty. We have then called into being a new creation, as a token of Our grace unto men. I am, verily, the All-Bountiful, the Ancient of Days. This is the Day whereon the unseen world crieth out: ‘Great is thy blessedness, O earth, for thou hast been made the foot-stool of thy God, and been chosen as the seat of His mighty throne!’ The realm of glory exclaimeth: ‘Would that my life could be sacrificed for thee, for He Who is the Beloved of the All-Merciful hath established His sovereignty upon thee, through the power of His name that hath been promised unto all things, whether of the past or of the future.’” Shoghi.
Haifa, Palestine, March 11, 1936.

Baha'i activities, Baha'i friendship for what ?


Hi, I'm new to this but I wanted to speak about my recent experiences with the local Baha'i cluster, their activities and how I lost most of my friends after I decided to stop participating in their events.

Firstly, I wanted to mention that I'm an atheist, I always have been and I imagine I always will be. I'm not sure if any of them knew that then, and I wonder if that played a role in how they treat me now. Although I dislike religion and what my friends did over the past year, I was never traumatised or severely upset by anything that happened and I can't say I dislike any of these friends even if I disagree with them now.

At the start of 2016, my close friend invited me to a youth gathering which she described was for "community building activities" and "empowering youth," with absolutely no mention of any religious component. I attended, we only discussed the societal potential of young people and by the end of the day some older youth I met had already signed me up to start the Ruhi Institute books despite the fact that I'd never heard of them and they didn't show them to us or tell us what they were about.

I continued meeting with my new friends throughout the year because I enjoyed their company and learning about their work, but each time our conversations about community and youth would become slightly less secular and eventually all we talked about was in context of the Baha'i faith. Nobody was forcing me to participate, but there was a LOT of manipulation and pressuring on their behalf from the beginning, which sadly I chose to overlook.

Amongst the possibly hundreds of people I met in the year, there were about 10 people around my age who I became particularly close to. We often had meals together, met outside of school and on weekends just to hang out together as we enjoyed each other's company. I had a lot of fun with these people and I was frequently invited to join them whenever they met, which I appreciated because it made me feel included and important for once.

At different stages in 2016, but particularly towards the end of the year, we (the non-Bahai's who were a part of the cluster) were expected to attend several Ruhi study circles and devotionals a week, go to regular Institute camps, have our own Junior Youth groups or Baha'i Children's Classes, regularly doorknock and attempt to involve our friends, classmates and any strangers we encountered in our activities. Although I wasn't bothered by the frequency of these things, as someone who is strongly against religious proselytizing I decided it was time for me to withdraw once and for all. I told my friend (also a non-Baha'i in the group, who is one of the 1 or 2 who I think genuinely cares for me) I didn't want to be a part of cluster activities anymore. She said she'd let the others know, and that marked the end of my year working with the Baha'is in my city.

Since then, December of last year, I barely socialise in groups outside of school. I'm not particularly bothered by this since I like to be alone, but it feels strange after a year filled with things to do every week. I've been invited to one or two casual catch-ups since, but recently I've tried to organise my own with four individual people from this group and every single time I was told they were busy, not available, etc., and even though I know they don't owe me their time, it's very clear to me that they are making an active choice to not see me. I think they see me as an apostate and somehow threatening to them, or at the very least they have realised that I'm not receptive to their religion and I refuse to spread it for them, so they don't have a use for me anymore. I love my friends, but I have to say their behaviour could be quite pathetic at times and I've always just felt sorry for them when they talk about the Baha'i faith. I'm sure they must have been furious when I left abruptly since they used up so much of their time and resources on me, but the only thing I feel bad about is allowing myself to be manipulated for an entire year.

That's all. I'm not sure if many people frequent this subreddit, but I'd appreciate some feedback, opinions, any commentary really. There's nobody I can really speak to about this since nobody I know in person can relate. Have any of you experienced something similar to this? What do you think?

https://www.reddit.com/r/exbahai/comments/5xt0fa/i_lost_my_closest_friends_after_resigning_from/

What are Ayyam-i-Ha ?


by A35821361

On February 26th the Bahá'í calendar marks the start of the intercalary days known as Ayyám-i-Há.

A Muslim acquaintance pointed out, that Bahá'ís accept the Qur'an as the inerrant word of God (unlike the Bible), yet the Bahá'í calendar contradicts this verse in the Qur'an, 9:36...

The number of months with Allah has been twelve months by Allah's ordinance since the day He created the heavens and the earth. Of these four are known as forbidden [to fight in]; That is the straight usage, so do not wrong yourselves therein, and fight against the disbelievers collectively as they fight against you collectively. But know that Allah is with those who are righteous.

The pre-Islamic calendar utilized an intercalary month, a practice called Nasi', that was prohibited by Muhammad in his farewell sermon...

Certainly the Nasi' is an impious addition, which has led the infidels into error. One year they authorise the Nasi', another year they forbid it. They observe the divine precept with respect to the number of the sacred months, but in fact they profane that which God has declared to be inviolable, and sanctify that which God has declared to be profane. Assuredly time, in its revolution, has returned to such as it was at the creation of the heavens and the earth. In the eyes of God the number of the months is twelve. Among these twelve months four are sacred, namely, Rajab, which stands alone, and three others which are consecutive

How Australian Ex-Baha'i Rachel Woodlock was treated by Baha'is after she accepted Islam.

Rachel Woodlock

 The most unsettling reaction came from an old friend (Baha'i) of my parents, a highly respected elder of the community. I was attending a Baha'i meeting with John, and towards the end of the evening, Mr Aristu* pulled me aside to ask why I had converted. "You know," he said, leaning in close, "in Iran, if it were the other way around, you'd be killed." He seemed to enjoy startling me. I went home in tears. I guess even peaceable Baha'is don't deal well with apostates.

Read full story here :

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/real-life/the-big-read-rachel-woodlock-tells-how-her-conversion-to-islam-was-a-personal-awakening/news-story/6432d30befc7b9ed1719a2da319056cd

Australian Baha'i converts to Islam


Four Australian thinkers come together to ask and answer the big questions, such as: What is the nature of the universe? Doesn't religion cause most of the conflict in the world? and Where do we find hope? We are introduced to the detail of different belief systems - Judaism, Christianity, Islam - and to the argument that atheism, like organised religion, has its own compelling logic. And we gain insight into the life events that led each author to their current position. Jane Caro flirted briefly with spiritual belief, inspired by 19th century literary heroines such as Elizabeth Gaskell and the Brontë sisters. Antony Lowenstein is proudly culturally, yet unconventionally, Jewish. Simon Smart is firmly and resolutely a Christian, but one who has had some of his most profound spiritual moments while surfing. Rachel Woodlock grew up in the alternative embrace of Baha'i belief but became entranced by its older parent religion, Islam. Provocative, informative and passionately argued, For God's Sake encourages us to accept religious differences but to also challenge more vigorously the beliefs that create discord.

Iranian Jews are more faithful to Iran than Iranian Bahai's



Iranian Bahai's whichever part of the world they are, their main goal is to defame Iran.
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